Category Archives: Dips

Tahini Dressing

Probably the most asked about, straightforward and delicious recipe we do. It will save meal times when all you fancy is steamed vegetables and brown rice, or a crunchy cos salad.  You could also have with crunchy crudites.

The measurements are just a guide, so that you can learn how to make this. If you need more then just double, or even triple up.

Ingredients 

2 tbsps tahini
2 tsps tamari (or soya sauce)
Half a lemon
Mineral water

Method

Put the tahini, tamari, lemon juice and a splash of water into a bowl and stir well. At this point the dressing will go very thick and look a bit strange. Slowly keep adding water and stirring until you have a nice smooth consistency. If you are using as a salad dressing you will want it thinner than if you were using it as a sauce for vegetables.

Sprouted Sunflower Seed and Mushroom Pate

If you are trying not to snack on rubbish, this kind of thing will be just what you need in your fridge.  It will last three or four days in a plastic container and is perfect with crackers or crudites.  It would also work well in the context of a ‘mezze’ which I willl develop later in the blog. You can find almond paste in health food shops and is a nice alternative to tahini particularly in dips such as this one.  It is rich in protein and full of flavor.

Ingredients 

100g mushrooms
75g sprouted sunflower seeds (see tipsanything sprouted will do it)
40ml almond paste or tahini
Juice of half a lemon
20ml olive oil

Method 

Clean the mushrooms and peel them.  It is better not to wash mushrooms as they tend to go slimy which often puts a lot of people off.  Slice them and put all of the above ingredients into a blender and pulse until you have a  smooth consistency.

Place in a bowl to serve and drizzle over a little extra olive oil.

Holy Moly Guacomole

Guacomole

There are many different ways to make guacamole.  This is by far the most popular version that I have arrived at.  By losing the raw garlic and onion as used in most other recipes, you reconnect with the dreaminess and subtly  of creamed avocado.  If you can’t get coriander then you can use mint or basil. You can also lose the tomato and you don’t have to peel it. I have only just started to peel the tomato (see  tips) as a matter of detail, but you must remove the seeds. Take time to cut the tomato and chilli.  You can achieve a certain level of knife skills and these are classic ways to practice. Keep the cuts even and the same size.

Not only the best fruit source of Vitamin E, avocados (despite being green) contain a wide variety of carotenoids. So as well as being delicious they are a powerhouse of the nutrients that help keep our cells young and our bodies cancer-free.

Ingredients

250g ripe avocado skinned and stoned
8g coriander
1 juicy lime
8g chives
1 red chili de-seeded and cut into small squares
1 tomato (skinned and de-seeded, optional)
1/4 teaspoon of Maldon sea-salt
50ml olive oil

Method

Remove the stone and scoop out the avocado flesh from the skin and put into a bowl. Skin, de-seed and cut the tomato into small squares. Finely chop the chives and coriander, squeeze the lime,  then add the olive oil and other ingredients to the mix. Preferably use a glass or plastic bowl and a silicon spatula or a wooden spoon (Not using metal slows down the oxidization process which happens quickly with avocados)

Gently start breaking up the avocado by gently mashing the bigger pieces down. Then gently keep turning the mix over, breaking down and turning. It will start coming together and going creamy. Taste for seasoning when you have the required consistency,  I like it to have some texture and not be completely smooth.

Hummus

If you are going to have one dip nailed and down in your repertoire then let it be hummus.  There are a lot of different dips out there but hummus without a doubt is King.  It´s good for a week in the fridge so don’t worry if it seems like a lot when you make it, keep it in covered in the fridge for ‘snack attacks.’  Raw vegetables, rice crackers anything like that with hummus fills the hole in a low fat and healthy way. It also works  well as an accompaniment with lamb, chicken, boiled egg and salads.The main ingredient in this dish is tahini (sesame paste) – readily available in UK supermarkets and health food shops – so don’t scrimp on it.  Here I use 125ml, you could get away with 100ml, any less and the hummus will not taste right.  It seems like a lot to use, but tahini is the money shot ingredient.Hummus is a double dose of protein from the chick peas and the sesame paste as well being of high fibre content.

Ingredients

250g cooked chickpeas (soaked and cooked or from a tin)
Juice of 1 lemon
2-3 cloves of garlic, crushed
125ml (half a cup) tahini
80ml (third of a cup) olive oil
175ml (1 cup) of water
Three large pinches of Maldon sea salt

Method

Blend all of the ingredients together in a blender, until smooth  (you can use a stick blender if you don’t have a Magi-mix type blender).  You may need to add more water – as there are so many different sizes and types of chick pea, its hard to quantify, just add water bit by bit.  You are looking for a smooth consistency and not too thick.  Taste for seasoning.

Place into a serving bowl, pour a little olive oil over before serving.